Saturday, January 4, 2014

The Lone Tree

There's a tree left
long ago by Farmer Groves
in the pasture.

Why did he leave
this orphan to grow
with no family nearby?

In the morning,
white-tailed deer nibble
blades of grass

glistening with dewdrops.
At night wild turkeys
rest in the arms

of the old oak tree.
Did Farmer Groves leave
this tree to shade

cattle during dog days,
or to shelter them from storms?
The lone tree stands

wrinkled, twisted, and dry.
The blackbirds chatter
and fly to its branches.

In the dark winter,
snow dusts the spine
of the tree shivering alone.
                --Brenda Kay Ledford

Do any of my blogger friends know why farmers used to leave one tree alone in the pasture?












12 comments:

magnolias+tea said...

Hi Brenda,
The poem is beautiful and so descriptive, I could see the birds in the branches of the tree.
Farmers left a lone tree in their fields for shade to rest under when they took a break from plowing and harvesting.

lil red hen said...

Great descriptive poem, Brenda!
I don't know why it would be left, but it can be dangerous in a summer thunderstorm. If cattle are using it for shade and lightening strikes the tree, the cattle can be killed.

Daisy said...

Lovely poem, Brenda. The last stanza is my favorite. Beautiful imagery!

Betsy Adams said...

Love your poem... I am always drawn to lone trees when we are traveling and I am photographing. There's just something about that lone tree out there!!!!

Stay warm this week...
Hugs,
Betsy

Susie Swanson said...

Beautiful poem Brenda. I can only guess but would say probably to have a shade to rest under. You and your mother stay warm and take care.

Muddling Through said...

No idea. I do remember though my grandfather's heartbreak when he lost thirteen of his cows who were sheltering under a tree when it was struck by lightning. So sad.

HOOTIN ANNI said...

I love the line when the snow dusts the spine!!!

Well done....very descriptive. Such talent.

TexWisGirl said...

i'm not sure why, but i'm always glad when they do - for birds, for livestock.

janet smart said...

I have no idea, Brenda. Maybe there was no reason or maybe he wanted it as a shade tree while he was out working in the hot sun.

Rana Williams said...

Brenda,
Thank you for this lovely poem. I really enjoyed reading your poem very much!

Thank you,
Rana

Tipper said...

Loved the poem Brenda-and the photos too!

Joyce Olson said...

Brenda,
A lovely poem and photos. I grew up on a farm-I cherish each moment of those childhood days and would love to live in the open spaces again.
I am visiting from As The Crackerhead Crumbles- where you are one of the features, as am I.

Have a lovely day,
Jemma