Saturday, January 30, 2016

Brenda Kay Ledford Published in Best Angel Stories 2016

Brenda Kay Ledford's story, "Angels Over Iraq," was published in The Best Angel Stories 2016 by Guideposts Organization. This hardcover book is available at Amazon.com.


Brenda's story, "Angels Over Iraq," was first printed in Angels Magazine. Guideposts selected the best stories that appeared in this magazine and published a hardcover anthology.  Brenda's story was included in this book.


Her story is about her nephew who served two tours of duty in Iraq.  She had a dream that angels were protecting him and wrote a story about her vision.  It was included in both the magazine and anthology. 


The Lord did in fact protect John and he got home to America. He was called to preach and is now attending divinity school.


God does great things!


His grandfather was also a Southern Baptist minister for 40 years.  We are praying God will lead John in the field where it's His will to use him for God's glory.  We appreciate very much the prayers of our blogger friends that John will be used in a mighty way for the Kingdom of God.









Monday, January 25, 2016

Best L'il Corner

The next time you lickety-split to my neck of the woods, visit the Best L'il Corner.  It's off the round-about just before you cruise into Hayesville,NC.

You'll step back in time at this old-fashioned ice-cream parlor, burger and sandwich shop.  Antiques ranging from a crank telephone, rocky horse, rag dolls, a telephone booth, vintage china, old posters, ice-cold bottled Cokes, moon pies, antique furniture, farm tools, and many other mountain crafts dot this unique parlor.

I often visit the L'il Corner to escape stress.  Tension melts like hot butter in this peaceful place.  It's also a great place to write while I savor an old-timey cola float, or lick a strawberry ice-cream cone, or chomp a triple-chocolate-fudge brownie.

Besides these deliciously sinful desserts, you'll find sandwiches, burgers, homemade soups, chili and beans, hotdogs, and scrumptious salads.  Waiters serve a free bag of fresh-popped corn as an appetizer as you study the menu.

It's a living history lesson in this little shop.  I recall in the 1960s we would drop by this parlor every Sunday after church.  Back then we didn't have any restaurants in our little mountain town.

Johnny Beal owned the country store back then.  We got some bologna, a loaf of bread, hoop cheese, moonpies, and RC Colas for our lunch.

Each time I dine at the Best L'il Corner, it's a pleasant experience.  I think you will enjoy a jaunt to this little ice-cream parlor, too.



Thursday, December 31, 2015

Book Review: Rainbow Chaser

Book Review:  Rainbow Chaser
                         by:  Connie Biltz

One of my blogger friends, Daisy, at:  www.conniebiltz.com, has written a terrific poetry book, Rainbow Chaser. Here's a brief review of her book.

Biltz, Connie.  Rainbow Chaser. Bradenton, Florida:  BookLocker.com, Inc., 2015.  163 pp., paperback.  $14.95.

Connie Biltz chases the gloom away with her delightful poetry book, Rainbow Chaser. Sip a cup of hot cocoa and refresh your soul with her verse.  Her title poem seeks goodness in the world:

"Bring on the colors, the glow, and the hope.
...so call me a rainbow chaser.
Bring on the balloons, the chocolate, and the confetti,
I guarantee we won't regret it."

Connie takes the readers on an image-filled journey in her poetry book.  She uses sounds and word play to keep the fingers flipping the pages.  Her sense of humor amuses and surprises us.

Nature influences her poetry.  Not even the rain keeps "Rainy Day Daisy," down:

"Swaying in the wind,
a daisy stoops and struggles
under the weight of heavy rain.

...Springing back after the storm,
tilting and nodding,
the daisy turns
and faces the sun."

We take an exciting walk in her poem, "My Listening Walk."  Sounds, word play, and rhythm get our feet tapping:

"Walking shoes, rhythmic feet,
catch in a bit of gravel-
ping, clickety, ping."

Connie's poem, "Whispering of Angels," soothes the spirit at this time of year:
"Midst the clamor of merrymaking, card-sending, and cookie-baking, seek the quiet of the not-yet-frozen lake.  Listen closely.  Hear the whisper of angels as you savor each glittery snowflake."

She captures vivid word images in the changing seasons.  Sparks ignite leaves in "Flames of Fire."  Chocolate sauce drizzles over ribbons of peppermint in a winter sunset.  Piles of sculpted snow are like slain dragons on the sides of roads.  At last a bunny bounces, kicks up spring. Now look!  Think of the crocus and its amazing hocus pocus.  Winter may cling and linger, but it will eventually slither away.Besides writing about nature, Connie's family and friends are dear to her.  "Gratitude List" and "Blessings Counted" cause us to pause.  Ponder.  Give thanks!

"Bits and Pieces" is the final curtain of her poetry collection.  Get connected.  "Ditch Those Digital Devices":

...Put the phone down.
Look up and look around.
Communicate one on one:
make a friend, make a point,
win a heart, and stir affection."

Connie Biltz wins hearts with her beautiful poetry book, Rainbow Chaser. It's a great read!

You may order Connie's book at Amazon.com, or contact her at:  www.connieblitz.com.

Book reviewed by:  Brenda Kay Ledford

New Year's Day

The last day
of December
black dots
punctuate
the verdant grass
flash floods
the field--a pond
deer nibble cut corn
rhododendrons budding
in the Blue Ridge Mountains
unseasonable weather
El Nino
traffic startles
the crows
a black blanket
soars to the pines
squawk, squawk, squawking 
a scarlet ribbon
flutters through fog
the cardinal
heralds
a New Year!
         --Brenda Kay Ledford

I wish my blogger friends a very Happy New Year!

Monday, November 30, 2015

Old Christmas

OLD CHRISTMAS
Circa 1932

Not a sound
in the Matheson Cove,
snow glowing on black velvet,
cattle kneel at midnight.

Rabbit tracks zigzag
across the Shewbird Mountain,
wood smoke curves heavenward,
icicles dangle from the log cabin.

A hickory log flickers
in the fireplace,
corn pone bakes in the Dutch oven,
paper chains and popcorn

drape the fir tree.
Younguns toss in feather beds,
listen for reindeer on the roof,
will Santy Claus find the cove?

Early Christmas morning,
cranberry skies spill across
the Blue Ridge Mountains
echoing with sleigh bells.

Ronda, Reba, Ralph, Reuben,
Rena, Robert, Robenia, and Ray
grab goodies from their stockings:
apples, oranges, hazel nuts,

candy canes, peppermint drops, toys
Pa carved in the woodshed.
Before dinner Ma reads
the story of baby Jesus.

Robert gets his fiddle,
voices blend with carols.
An old-fashioned Christmas,
come to the manger!
                     --Brenda Kay Ledford











My mom ( Blanche), and I wish all our blogger friends a very Merry Christmas and joyful New Year!

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Freedom Barn

There's a unique barn located on the outskirts of Hayesville, NC.  It captures the Appalachina culture and our country's freedom. 

A replica of the Statue of Liberty and an old tractor grace the front of this historical building.

Bruce Davenport of Hayesville, owns this barn and has restored it.  He and his family decorate it seasonally.  The old girl shines in all her glory at Christmastime.

It's ironic that Bruce placed the Statue of Liberty in front of the barn.  In the Blue Ridge Mountains, the barn was central to farm life.  Here the mountaineers stored hay, housed the livestock, milked cows, fed cattle and horses grain, cleaned the stalls, shucked and shelled corn, and stored the tools to upkeep farm equipment.  Work.  Always work.

The good old days were hard.  There was hardly any leisure time for the farmers.  In this sense, I think freedom is a good symbol for the old barn.  Freedom from working sunrise to sunset on the farm, digging a living out of the earth is a good theme to preserve.

I love old barns and this is one of my favorite in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina.


Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Veteran's Day

 
 
It was one of those days.  My list of chores included shopping for groceries.  Most times I don't dread this task, but I was running out of time and needed to hurry, hurry, hurry.
 
I pulled into the parking lot at Ingles and rushed to get my groceries.  A soldier sauntered across the lot wearing his uniform.  He walked straight as a stick with his head held high.  I wanted to shout and thank him for his service, but he was gone before I had a chance to show my appreciation.
 
My mind raced with thoughts of our military.  Despite what some folks might think, our country is in war overseas.  Soldiers are giving their lives for our freedom.  How often do we think of our soldiers?  How often do we remember to pray for their safety? 
 
Many men in my family served in the military.  Uncles fought in World War I and World War II.  My brother served with the US Army in Vietnam.  My nephew completed two tours of duty in Iraq and was wounded in the line of duty.
 
Other families have suffered great loss.  Their loved ones did not come home from war.
 
As we observe Veteran's Day, I think we should lift special prayers for the safety of our men and women serving in the military. If we see soldiers at church or at a patriotic  service, thank them for their service.  Also, in my latest edition of "Guidepost Magazine," we can subscribe for members of the military.  What an encouragement to young men or women to read this wonderful magazine while serving overseas, or recovering from injuries in a Veteran's Hospital.
 
There are many ways we can show thanks for our military.  We can  attend a patriotic service, write letters to the soldiers, send CARE packages, or just sing, "God Bless America." 
 
I want to thank all of my blogger friends who have served in the military.  It is because of your sacrifice we enjoy the freedom we have in America.
 

 
 

This World War II veteran proudly holds the USA flag.  He served his country with honor and duty.

This is a photo of my Uncle George Lee.  He served in the US Army during World War II and was wounded.  He received a purple heart for fighting for his country.  He was very active in the local VFW organization.  The local veterans named the George Lee American Legion after him because he helped so many people in the community of Clay County, NC.