Thursday, November 12, 2015

Freedom Barn

There's a unique barn located on the outskirts of Hayesville, NC.  It captures the Appalachina culture and our country's freedom. 

A replica of the Statue of Liberty and an old tractor grace the front of this historical building.

Bruce Davenport of Hayesville, owns this barn and has restored it.  He and his family decorate it seasonally.  The old girl shines in all her glory at Christmastime.

It's ironic that Bruce placed the Statue of Liberty in front of the barn.  In the Blue Ridge Mountains, the barn was central to farm life.  Here the mountaineers stored hay, housed the livestock, milked cows, fed cattle and horses grain, cleaned the stalls, shucked and shelled corn, and stored the tools to upkeep farm equipment.  Work.  Always work.

The good old days were hard.  There was hardly any leisure time for the farmers.  In this sense, I think freedom is a good symbol for the old barn.  Freedom from working sunrise to sunset on the farm, digging a living out of the earth is a good theme to preserve.

I love old barns and this is one of my favorite in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina.


12 comments:

magnoliasntea said...

Love the barn, the restoration job looks really good. Interesting that there is a replica of the Statue of Liberty there in front of the barn, but I can see how the connection would fit.
have a great weekend!

Daisy said...

What an interesting photo and story! I enjoy seeing old barns and like it when they are restored or kept in good condition like that. Your header photo is beautiful with such a colorful fall scene.

Glenda Beall said...

I see that barn and the Statue of Liberty often when I pass that way, Brenda. Thanks for the background on it.
I,too, love barns. Some of my greatest memories of childhood are those of playing in the barn with the kittens born there and petting the little calves.

lil red hen said...

Isn't it wonderful to know the barn has been restored! There are no barns in this style here, most being built from steel trusses. Like Glenda, childhood memories of playing in the barn are some of my best also.

Susie Swanson said...

We saw this not to long a go and wondered about the history on it. It was so beautiful and I hated that I didn't have my camera with me. Thanks Brenda.

Cranberry Morning said...

Wow, Brenda, that is a splendid photo! So many beautiful and interesting things in it - and I love that autumn header. Stunning!

Mildred said...

This is very interesting. Thank you for sharing the photo and I love your header picture also. Sending our love and best wishes for a nice Thanksgiving.

TexWisGirl said...

that's unique!!

you should link in to the barn collective at
http://backroadstraveller.blogspot.com/

Yesteryear Embroideries said...

Such a great story to go with such a neat barn. It is hard to find old barns in our area

Eggs In My Pocket said...

Loved the post about the barn. So interesting. Old barns are hard to find in my area

Elaine/Muddling Through said...

Barns are certainly a well-loved part of rural American life. I know my siblings and I enjoyed lots of play time in our grandparents' barn.

Janet, said...

That is neat. Farming is still a hard life. There are a lot of farms where I live and they keep soooo busy!

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